River Facts

 

The Boyne River Main Stream

The Boyne River main stream is 5.6 river miles long from its mouth at Lake Charlevoix to the junction of the North Branch and the South Branch just north of Boyne Falls.

The Boyne River North Branch

The Boyne River North Branch is 5.9 river miles long from the junction of the North Branch and the South Branch just north of Boyne Falls to its source just west of Thumb Lake.

The Boyne River South Branch

The Boyne River South Branch is 10.5 river miles long from the junction of the North Branch and the South Branch just north of Boyne Falls to its source just south of Elmira.

Did you know?

  • Parts of the Boyne River are designated as a Blue Ribbon Trout Stream by the Michigan DNR.
  • The Watershed Council has been monitoring the Boyne River since 2004 in our Comprehensive Water Quality Monitoring program, which collects data on temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, ph, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and chloride concentration.
  • If you search hard for bugs in the Boyne River, you man find the fierce pinching larvae or heavily-armored adult form of a predacious diving beetle in the family Dytiscidae.
  • The watershed of the Boyne River is about 63 square miles.
  • The Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council has developed a new system to “score” the water quality of a stream site based on the numbers of Families, EPT (mayfly, stonefly, and caddisfly) Families, and sensitive Families of macro invertebrates found.  The score is based is assigned a letter grade like in school.  The Boyne River sites typically score an A or a B, and ofter score an A+, which indicates high water quality.
  • The giant, prehistoric, armor-plated, pollution-sensitive, herbivorous stonefly in the genus Pteronarcys has been found at all four sites monitored on the Boyne.
  • The Boyne River Watershed is bordered by the Bear River to the north, the Sturgeon to the east, the AuSable and Manistee to the south, and Jordan to the west-southwest.
  • There are two man-made dams on the Boyne river, at Dam Road and Boyne Falls, which create barriers to fish passage and elevate water temperatures; elevated water temperatures can affect pollution-sensitive aquatic organisms, such as Brook Trout and stoneflies.
  • The Boyne River originates near some of the highest hills in the Lower Peninsula (Chandler Hill) with Hudson Lookout to the south of Thumb Lake reaching over 1500 feet above sea level.
  • The Boyne is an enjoyable 1-2 hour paddle from Dam Road down to Lake Charlevoix.